Per Kirkeby
Wanås, 1994

Jacob Dahlgren 
Primary Structure,
2011

Wanås

Dan Graham,
Two Different Anamorphic Surfaces, 2000

Martin Puryear
Meditation in a
Beech Wood
, 1996


The Childrens’ Book 2015 – Jenny Granlund and Johanna Koljonen

Inspired by the park and the art Wanås Konst’s fifth foray into children’s books is a collaboration between artist Jenny Granlund and author, critic, and program host Johanna Koljonen. Each year since 2011, new writers and artists have accepted the challenge. Sometimes the words come first and then the pictures; other times a certain image has been the starting point. Astrid Lindgren wrote that children’s books are their very own art form, and the children’s book series at Wanås has been a way to explore the genre alongside artists and writers. This year, artist Jenny Granlund and author, critic, and program host Johanna Koljonen have created a story set amid the many trees, artworks, and historic structures in the park. The story is still a secret but as in many great books a map plays a crucial role. Join the sneak peek and find out the secret story!The book and the project will be presented with a series of event.

Exhibition: May 17 – November 1, 2015.

Sneak peek for kids of all ages. June 14, 2015.

Book release: August 22, 2015


Wanås Konst barnbok /the children’s book 2015. Jag vill bygga, text av/by Johanna Koljonen och bild av /and artwork by Jenny Granlund. Eleven Minute Line, 2004.
Wanås Konst barnbok /the children’s book 2015. Jag vill bygga, text av/by Johanna Koljonen och bild av /and artwork by Jenny Granlund. Maya Lin, Eleven Minute Line, 2004.
Wanås Konst barnbok /the children’s book 2015. Jag vill bygga, text av/by Johanna Koljonen och bild av /and artwork by Jenny Granlund. Anne Thulin, Double Dribble, 2010.
Wanås Konst barnbok /the children’s book 2015. Jag vill bygga, text av/by Johanna Koljonen och bild av /and artwork by Jenny Granlund. Esther Shalev-Gerz, Les Inseparables, 2000 – 2008.
Wanås Konst barnbok /the children’s book 2015. Jag vill bygga, text av/by Johanna Koljonen och bild av /and artwork by Jenny Granlund. Omslagsbild/Cover. Här börjar upptäcktsfärden i skulpturparken. This is where the adventure in the sculpture park starts.

Johanna Koljonen and Jenny Granlund at Wanås 2015. Photo Wanås Konst


ALBIN HILLERVIK What is your experience of Wanås and the park? What were your first impressions of the place, was there anything in particular that captured your interest?

JENNY GRANLUND The first thing that caught my eye were the mole holes. They show up everywhere in the park, as if the moles are what connect the forest and the art, with their tunnels and their subterranean whatever-it-is-they’redoing-down-there activities.

JOHANNA KOLJONEN I was surprised by how wild and natural the nature at Wanås is allowed to be. I had imagined something more like an English park, a style I love, but where the art would feel more arranged. Here, you get the feeling that the art could have literally grown out of the place.

AH In what ways does Wanås show up in your children’s book?

JG Wanås is a constant presence in the pictures. My wish is for the pictures to be a walk through the park and the forest with everything present: art, trees, songbirds—everything. 

AH Jenny, you draw pictures that weave together organic landscapes with architectural forms. The pictures often have titles that stand out. For me, there are associations with clichés and language. What is your relationship to words when you draw?

JG Powerful. A text or a word gives off a rhythm, a beat, a flourish, something with form. This form can either be the starting point for a thought that becomes woven into a picture, or it becomes the wrapper for the thought and the image. I enjoy collaboration, and word and image collaborate with each other to create something other.

AH After your first visit to Wanås together, Jenny started by drawing a map. What do maps signify for you?

JK It’s a convention for children’s books that describe a world, especially magical worlds, to begin with a map. When I was little there were posters of Moominvalley and Tolkien’s Middle-earth on the walls in my bedroom. The maps become like a manifestation of the story as a place.

AH How will the map work in the book?

JG It’s an overview, really, and makes it easier to get your bearings. It’s probably a deeply human trait to make maps, since I don’t think we have the same ability to read our environment as animals do. Maps are also appealing because of their perspective. People are generally earthbound. A map lends you a perspective usually reserved for God and the birds.

Interview by Albin Hillervik